Dressing for Parkinson's

Parkinson’s can be a debilitating illness affecting many activities of daily living. A person with Parkinson’s may experience stiffness and loss of coordination and dexterity, making dressing oneself increasingly difficult. Additionally, changes in skin sensitivity and temperature regulation may necessitate new clothing choices. Smart clothing choices can help an individual retain independence and comfort.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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When tremors are present, magnetic or hook & loop closures can make it easier to dress without assistance.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

 

Look for dressing aid products such as buttonhooks, dressing sticks, sock donners or sock horns to make dressing simpler.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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Those with urinary urgency should consider quick-release waistbands that minimize the amount of time to doff the pants.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

When tingling or painful skin are experienced, choose garments designed with flat seams to minimize skin irritation and remove all interior garment tags.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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Excessive sweating and inability to regulate temperature can occur with Parkinson’s. Choose textiles made of synthetic blends that pull moisture away from the skin while still providing warmth.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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Replace standard shoe laces with elasticized laces that do not need to be tied.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

Look for tops that open fully in the front and have a wide armhole to accommodate donning with stiff joints.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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Add a metal ring with an opening or an easy-grip ribbon to a zipper pull to make them easier to grasp.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.

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If wearing a belt, thread belt through belt loops before putting on pants.While dressing, look for skin irritations particularly on the neck, back, backside, elbows and heels. A person with dementia- related illness might not be able to articulate a skin irritation that may lead to pain and discomfort.